Oral Drug Side Affects

BIRTH CONTROL PILLS MAY UP GUM DISEASE RISK

Various oral contraceptives appear to have differing effects on a woman's risk of developing gum disease -- the leading cause of tooth loss. A number of studies have suggested that sex hormones influence the progression of gum disease. At least one study has found that levels of gum disease-causing bacteria in a woman's mouth may increase after she begins using oral contraceptives.

COMMENT: I believe that virtually all women should not take birth control pills. These synthetic hormones are fraught with multiple complications and we may only know the tip of the iceberg. They clearly increase the risk of breast cancer and now we find out that they can also increase your risk of gum disease and tooth decay.

Contraception 1998;57:381-384.

USE OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES INCREASES RISK OF BONE FRACTURES

The use of oral contraceptives not only fails to protect women from bone fractures, but also increases the risk of fractures by about 20% compared with outcomes in women who have never used oral contraceptives. For all types of bone fractures combined, the research team found that the relative risk of fracture was 20% higher among women who had used oral contraceptives for a total of 25 months or more compared with women who had never used oral contraceptives. Among women who used oral contraceptives currently or had used contraceptives within the past 12 months, the risk was 30% higher.

COMMENT: There is almost no reason that I can recommend for anyone to be on birth control pills. If you or someone you know is on them, I would strongly encourage alternate strategies. If you are using them for contraception, one can try natural family planning (rhythm method) and a barrier protection such as a condom. When one uses both methods, the protection rate is nearly as good as the pill. If one is using the pill for dysfunctional periods, then natural progesterone is a far better option.

Contraception July, 1998;57:231-235

Oral Contraception and Health

BIRTH CONTROL PILLS MAY UP GUM DISEASE RISK

Various oral contraceptives appear to have differing effects on a woman's risk of developing gum disease -- the leading cause of tooth loss. A number of studies have suggested that sex hormones influence the progression of gum disease. At least one study has found that levels of gum disease-causing bacteria in a woman's mouth may increase after she begins using oral contraceptives.

COMMENT: I believe that virtually all women should not take birth control pills. These synthetic hormones are fraught with multiple complications and we may only know the tip of the iceberg. They clearly increase the risk of breast cancer and now we find out that they can also increase your risk of gum disease and tooth decay.

Contraception 1998;57:381-384.

USE OF ORAL CONTRACEPTIVES INCREASES RISK OF BONE FRACTURES

The use of oral contraceptives not only fails to protect women from bone fractures, but also increases the risk of fractures by about 20% compared with outcomes in women who have never used oral contraceptives. For all types of bone fractures combined, the research team found that the relative risk of fracture was 20% higher among women who had used oral contraceptives for a total of 25 months or more compared with women who had never used oral contraceptives. Among women who used oral contraceptives currently or had used contraceptives within the past 12 months, the risk was 30% higher.

COMMENT: There is almost no reason that I can recommend for anyone to be on birth control pills. If you or someone you know is on them, I would strongly encourage alternate strategies. If you are using them for contraception, one can try natural family planning (rhythm method) and a barrier protection such as a condom. When one uses both methods, the protection rate is nearly as good as the pill. If one is using the pill for dysfunctional periods, then natural progesterone is a far better option.

Contraception July, 1998;57:231-235

Contraception 198;57:381-384,1998;57:231-235,1998;57:381-384.July, 1998;57:231-235

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